Follow Up Calls Computer Software Service Fraud

Follow Up Calls Computer Software Service Fraud

There is concern that victims of previous Computer Software Service Fraud (CSSF) are being re-targeted for “owed money”. The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) reports that CSSF scammers are returning to contact previous victims, requesting that they pay money owed for a fake malware protection service they had provided. Alternatively, the fraudster will ask for a new subscription fee in return for protection from a new threat. The victims that have made payments to the fraudsters have done so via credit/debit card payments. In some instances threatening and aggressive language has been used against victims, as part of the attempt to coerce them into sending money.

Computer Software Service Fraud involves the victim being contacted, told that there is a problem with their computer, and that for a fee this issue can be resolved. The aim of the fraudster at this point is usually to gain remote access to the victim’s computer and, subsequently, access to their online banking account. No fix actually occurs. The victims will often be cold-called or will receive a pop-up on their computer, prompting them to phone the suspect.

Since the beginning of this year (2018), the total loss for repeat victims of CSSF has been reported as £16,712.85. The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has noticed an increase in such reports since the beginning of May.

Protect Yourself

• If you receive such an unsolicited call or pop-up, do not make a payment. Always ensure you know who you are talking to. If in doubt, hang up immediately.

• Do not allow remote access to your computer.

Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision. Under no circumstances would a genuine bank, or another trusted organisation, force you to make a financial transaction on the spot; they would never ask you to transfer money into another account for fraud reasons. Remember to stop and take time to carefully consider your actions.

Listen to your instincts. If something feels wrong then it is usually right to question it.  Criminals may lull you into a false sense of security when you are out and about or rely on your defences being down when you’re in the comfort of your own home. They may appear trustworthy, but they may not be who they claim to be.

For more information about how to protect yourself online, visit www.cyberaware.gov.ukand takefive-stopfraud.org.uk

If you have been a victim of fraud or cybercrime, report it to us at Actionfraud.police.uk, or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Message Sent By
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

Courier Fraud

Courier Fraud

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has identified an increasing number of reports submitted to Action Fraud from the public concerning courier fraud.
Fraudsters are contacting victims by telephone and purporting to be a police officer or bank official. To substantiate this claim, the caller might be able to confirm some easily obtainable basic details about the victim such as their full name and address. They may also offer a telephone number for the victim to call to check that they are genuine; this number is not genuine and simply redirects to the fraudster who pretends to be a different person. After some trust has been established, the fraudster will then, for example, suggest;
– Some money has been removed from a victim’s bank account and staff at their local bank branch are responsible.- Suspects have already been arrested but the “police” need money for evidence.- A business such as a jewellers or currency exchange is operating fraudulently and they require assistance to help secure evidence.

 

Victims are then asked to cooperate in an investigation by attending their bank and withdrawing money, withdrawing foreign currency from an exchange or purchasing an expensive item to hand over to a courier for examination who will also be a fraudster. Again, to reassure the victim, a safe word might be communicated to the victim so the courier appears genuine.
At the time of handover, unsuspecting victims are promised the money they’ve handed over or spent will be reimbursed but in reality there is no further contact and the money is never seen again.

Protect Yourself

Your bank or the police will never:

– Phone and ask you for your PIN or full banking password.

– Ask you to withdraw money to hand over to them for safe-keeping, or send someone to your home to collect cash, PIN, cards or cheque books if you are a victim of fraud.

 

Don’t assume an email or phone call is authentic
Just because someone knows your basic details (such as your name and address or even your mother’s maiden name), it doesn’t mean they are genuine. Be mindful of who you trust – criminals may try and trick you into their confidence by telling you that you’ve been a victim of fraud
Stay in control

If something feels wrong then it is usually right to question it. Have the confidence to refuse unusual requests for personal or financial information.

 

For more information about how to protect yourself online visit

www.cyberaware.gov.uk  and www.takefive.stopfraud.org.uk

Message Sent By
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)

New Ways To Protect You This National Neighbourhood Watch Week 2018

New Ways To Protect You This National Neighbourhood Watch Week 2018

It’s National Neighbourhood Watch Week 2018 (NNWW18) and we’ve got some exciting news to share with you!

This year to mark NNWW18 we’ve created a fantastic, brand new section of our popular website to share new and important information on keeping you and your neighbours safe. Because crime is changing and we want to do our bit to make all communities safer and stronger across England and Wales .

Click here to look at all the new information we’re sharing about crimes and modern issues that cause such significant harm in our communities.

NNWW18 runs until next Sunday, June 24– it’s our annual week of social action across our network of 2.3 million member households – so it’s a perfect time to take a look and share the knowledge!

On our website you’ll find new information, statistics and practical Toolkits that you can share on:

•             Domestic Abuse – which we know affects all communities

•             Serious Violence – particularly knife crime

•             Vulnerability and loneliness – affecting more people as families become more mobile

•             Fraud and scams – electronic and traditional

•             High harm crimes – Modern Slavery, Child Sexual Exploitation etc.

Please do tell us what you’re doing to mark NNWW18 – email Lisa Parker lisa.parker@ourwatch.org.uk so we can showcase your good work across our media channels!

The Twitter hashtag for the week is #NNWW18 and you can follow us at @N_Watch

Have a great week!

Neighbourhood Watch Network

Message Sent By
Lisa Parker (NHWN, Register Administrator, England & Wales)

June 2018 eNewsletter – FiRELiNK

New Chief Fire Officer announced

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service

Cheshire Fire Authority has confirmed the appointment of a new head of Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service.

Mark Cashin, currently Cheshire’s Deputy Chief Fire Officer, was selected to become the Service’s new Chief Fire Officer and Chief Executive after an interview panel and subsequent Member confirmation at a meeting of Cheshire Fire Authority (May 22).

Mr Cashin (49) will take up the post on 1 July 2018, succeeding Paul Hancock who recently announced his retirement.

Find out more – New Chief Fire Officer announced


IFE Centenary Conference

IFE conference

In September 2017 Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service (CFRS) opened the doors of a new state-of the-art lifeskills centre, Safety Central, aimed primarily at keeping young people safe. This prompted the Service’s decision to focus their forthcoming Institution of Fire Engineers centenary conference on and around young people.

The one day event, ‘100 Years Young – futureproofing Generation Alpha’, hosted by North Western Branch and Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service and sponsored by Paragon Creative, is on Thursday 19 July at Safety Central, Lymm, Warrington, Cheshire and is open to both IFE and non-IFE members. The title celebrates the IFE Centenary as well as highlighting the focus on young people born after 2011, designated Generation Alpha and predicted to be the most transformative generation ever.

Find out more – IFE Centenary Conference


Drowning prevention – be water aware

Water rescue by firefighters

Around 400 people drown in the UK every year and thousands more suffer injury, some life changing, through near-drowning experiences.

Many people that drown just happen to be near water – such as runners, walkers and fisherman.

Find out more – Drowning prevention


Summer safety

Barbecue

Stay safe during the summer months, use the links below to access fire safety tips and advice:


The Royal Cheshire Show 2018
Children having a discussion about escape plans with a Cheshire firefighter

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service will once again be at The Royal Cheshire Show, engaging with members of the public delivering vital road and fire safety information, along with the famous children’s yellow helmets.

Find out more – The Royal Cheshire Show 2018


Fire Station open days

Ellesmere Port Fire Station Open Day 2017

Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service fire stations will be holding free fire station open days over the next few months.

Find out more – Fire Station open days

Find out about your local fire station – where it is, what open days or special events they are holding and how to get in contact with them.

Find out more – Your local fire station

Return to latest news

Tsb Phishing Attacks

There has been a sharp rise in fraudsters sending out fake text messages (smishing) and phishing emails claiming to be from TSB. The increase in the number of reports corresponds with the timing of TSB’s computer system update, which resulted in 1.9 million users being locked out of their accounts. Opportunistic fraudsters are using TSB’s system issue to target people with this type of fraud.

Since the start of May there have been 321 phishing reports of TSB phishing made to Action Fraud. This is an increase of 970% on the previous month. In the same reporting period, there have been 51 reports of cybercrime to Action Fraud which mention TSB – an increase of 112% on the previous month.

Fraudsters are commonly using text messages as a way to defraud unsuspecting victims out of money. Known as smishing, this involves the victim receiving a text message purporting to be from TSB. The message requests that the recipient clicks onto a website link that leads to a phishing website designed to steal online banking details.

Although text messages are currently the most common delivery method, similar communications have been reported with fraudsters using email and telephone to defraud individuals.

In several cases, people have lost vast sums of money, with one victim losing £3,890 after initially receiving a text message claiming to be from TSB. Fraudsters used specialist software which changed the sender ID on the message so that it looked like it was from TSB. This added the spoofed text to an existing TSB message thread on the victim’s phone.

The victim clicked on the link within the text message and entered their personal information. Armed with this information, the fraudsters then called the victim back and persuaded them to hand over their banking authentication code from their mobile phone. The fraudsters then moved all of the victim’s savings to a current account and paid a suspicious company.

Protect Yourself:

Don’t assume an email or text is authentic:

Always question uninvited approaches in case it’s a scam. Phone numbers and email addresses can be spoofed, so always contact the company directly via a known email or phone number (such as the one on the back of your bank card).

Clicking on links/files

Don’t be tricked into giving a fraudster access to your personal or financial details. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected text or email. Remember, a genuine bank will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your full PIN or password.

If you have received a suspicious TSB email, please do not respond to it, report it to us https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_phishing and also forward it to ku.oc1531963594.bst@1531963594smacs1531963594liame1531963594

Every Report Matters. If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, report it to us online or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Visit Take Five and Cyber Aware for more information about how to protect yourself online.

Source: https://www.cheshirepolicealert.co.uk/da/221614/TSB%20Phishing%20Attacks%20.html

Tsb Port Out Alert

There has been an increase in reports made in May by TSB customers relating to “port-out” fraud. Fraudsters are number porting a victim’s telephone number to a SIM card under their control and then using the number to access the victim’s bank accounts.

The increase in the number of reports corresponds with the timing of TSB’s computer system update, which resulted in 1.9 million users being locked out of their accounts. Opportunistic fraudsters are using TSB’s system issue to target individuals, which follows the increase in phishing and smishing communications also targeting TSB customers this month. Victims’ bank account and personal details including their phone number are collected by the fraudster, providing them with the information to execute the fraud.

Number porting is a genuine service provided by telecommunication companies. It allows customers to keep their existing phone number and transfer it to a new SIM card. The existing network provider sends the customer a Port Authorisation Code (PAC), that when presented to the new provider allows the number to be transferred across. This service can, however, be abused by fraudsters.

To gain control of the victim’s phone number, fraudsters convince the victim’s mobile phone network provider to swap their number on to a SIM card in the fraudster’s control. Once the fraudster has control of the number they are able to intercept the victims’ text messages, allowing them to use services linked to the victim’s phone number. This can include requesting an online banking password reset or access to any two factor authentication services.

Victims have reported large losses as a result of this fraud. One victim initially dismissed text messages received from their network provider containing a PAC number. Two days later £6,000 was removed from the victim’s TSB current account. The victim subsequently contacted their phone provider and was informed that someone contacted the provider purporting to be the victim and had cancelled their contract and transferred their number to a new SIM. This action allowed the banking fraud to take place.

Protect Yourself:

PAC Code notifications

If you receive an unsolicited notification about a PAC Code request, contact your network provider immediately to terminate the request. Also notify your bank about your phone number being compromised.
Clicking on links/files:

Don’t be tricked into giving a fraudster access to your personal or financial details. Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text. Remember, criminals can spoof the phone numbers and email addresses of companies you know and trust, such as your bank.
Requests to move money:

A genuine bank or organisation will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your PIN, full password or to move money to another account.

Port-out Fraud versus SIM Swapping

Port-out fraud is often incorrectly referred to as SIM swap fraud. SIM swap fraud works in a similar fashion, however, instead of porting the victim’s number to a new network provider, the fraudster impersonates the victim and requests a new SIM card for their account. Once they have access to the new sim, they have access to the number.

Source: https://www.cheshirepolicealert.co.uk/da/221616/TSB%20Port%20Out%20Alert.html

UPDATE Sandymoor Playing field

Dear Resident,

I write with regards to the Sandymoor Sports development on Wharford Lane, Sandymoor. The land is owned by Sandymoor Parish Council (SPC) and was allocated for a recreational facility for Sandymoor residents as part of the overall Sandymoor Development Plan. The new facility will be built and maintained by the Parish.

Planning Permission was gained by the Parish for the Sports facility development last year, and I now wish to update you on progress of the project.

HBC have been working with SPC to implement this facility, which will be used under a shared use agreement by Sandymoor School and available to book out by residents outside school hours. Further details for how the new facilities can be booked will be advertised in due course.

A main contractor for construction of the works has been appointed and works are due start from 5th February 2018, with full site mobilization taking place from 26th March 2018. Access to the site will be via a temporary access point off Wharford Lane. The construction period is due to take 15 weeks with completion by late June/early July 2018, weather permitting.

The main contractor if fully aware of site constraints and highway restrictions and will work closely with the Parish and Council to minimize disruption to local residents and the adjacent school.

During the construction phase if you have any cause for concern, please do not hesitate to contact me on the telephone number above or on my email address – clerk@sandymoorparishcouncil.gov.uk

Warm regards, Bernadette Tarry, Clerk to Sandymoor Parish Council.